Overview

The Massachusetts General Hospital – McLean Hospital Adult Residency Training Program in Psychiatry has been designed to prepare resident physicians for the practice of psychiatry in the 21st century. The program emphasizes fundamental medical knowledge based on advances in clinical science and the growing contributions of basic and applied neurosciences. The core of each resident’s education is extraordinarily rich clinical experience through all the years of training. Each resident diagnoses and treats a broad range of patients along a continuum of care, and within a variety of treatment settings. Residents learn the various roles of the modern psychiatrist – primary clinician, consultant, team-leader, and therapist – with direct and skilled supervision. Clinical work and intensive supervision are complemented by a comprehensive curriculum of didactic seminars, rounds, and case conferences. While there is a core of experience and information with which all psychiatrists should be familiar, residents also need individualized experiences to meet their needs and interests. Therefore, the training program encourages elective opportunities in all years of training, with an unusually broad range of opportunities by the PGY-4 year, when all residents design their own individualized curriculum. There are readily available programs in Community Psychiatry, Global Psychiatry, Law and Psychiatry, Clinical Research, Mind Body Medicine, Medical Education, and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, to name just a few. For a brief overview of the MGH/McLean clinical rotations, please watch the video below.

The diversity in terms of patient population and resources across both the MGH and McLean campuses are enormous, providing ample opportunity to learn from patients and world-class clinicians in a supportive and dynamic environment. Jennifer Goetz, Class of 2017
The MGH/McLean program excites me because it encompasses patient care, research, and policy to create the best life possible for people who struggle with psychiatric illness. Katherine Koh, Class of 2018